Union Flag Close Up

Northern Ireland Hand Of Ulster

Hand Sewn Northern Ireland (Hand of Ulster) Flags are the traditional, and still the highest quality way to make a National Flag. Each Northern Ireland (Hand of Ulster) flag is manufactured by individually cutting and sewing together panels of the required colours to create the design required. Some National Flags with complex design or intricate detail are made with a printed panel which is then hand sewn onto the main flag. Each flag is finished with a double sewn hem and has a headband, rope & toggle so it can be flown from any standard flagpole.

Trivia

Unionists, and some sporting organisations, still fly the Ulster Banner even though it is not an official flag.

Technical Specifications

Adopted 1801
Proportion 1:2
Design The cross of Saint Patrick under the cross of Saint George and the cross of Saint Andrew on a blue field
Colours
PMS Blue: 280C Red: 186C
CMYK Blue: Cyan 100% Magenta 72% Yellow 0% Black 18.5%
  Red: Cyan 0% Magenta 91% Yellow 76% Black 6%

 

Northern Ireland (Hand of Ulster)

Brief History

The Flag of Ulster adopted around 1264. It features a yellow field with red cross, white shield and red right hand of Ulster. It was originally the flag of the kingdom of Ulster and became a provincial flag within Northern Ireland later on.

The Saint Patrick’s Flag has been used unofficially to represent Northern Ireland since 1780. While it isn’t an official flag it is the least contentious flag that has flown in northern Ireland. The flags design is a white field with a red cross.

 

The Flag of Ulster (1264 to Present Day)

Saint Patrick’s Flag Used Unofficially (1780 to Present Day)

In 1801 the Union Flag was adopted as the official flag of Northern Ireland. It features the cross of Saint Patrick under the cross of Saint George and the cross of Saint Andrew on a blue field.

The Irish Tricolour was unofficially adopted as the nationalist’s flag for the whole of Ireland in 1916. The green-white-orange horizontal tricolour is still unofficially flown today. The flag represents peace between the Catholics and the Protestants.  Green symbolising Catholics, orange symbolising Protestants and white representing peace.

In 1952 the Government of Northern Ireland adopted the Ulster Banner. It features the St George’s Cross defaced by a white six sided star, red hand of Ulster and royal crown. The star represents the six counties of Northern Ireland and the hand symbol originates from the Ulster province. The flag Is still flown unofficially today by loyalists and unionists.

The Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom

The Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom and It is the coat of Arms of Queen Elizabeth II.

It features a shield made up of the Royal Standard with a St Edward’s crowned lion on the right and a Scottish unicorn on the left. Above is a crowned helmet and crowned lion. Below is green grass with a Tudor rose, shamrock and thistle and a banner stating “SHAME UPON HIM WHO THINKS EVIL OF IT”.

The Royal Standard of the United Kingdom

The Royal Standard of the United Kingdom was adopted in 1837.

It is split into four sections the top left and the bottom right feature a red field with 3 golden lions representing England. The bottom right field features a blue field with golden harp representing Ireland and the top left is a gold field with red lion representing Scotland.

This is the banner of the Queen Elizabeth II.

The Provincial Flags of Ireland

The flag of the Province of Ulster is one of the four Provincial flags for the whole of Ireland. Often a single flag made up of all the separate flags is flown.

The Flag of the City of Belfast

The Flag of the City of Belfast is used by the Belfast Council and depicts a galley on waves with a red square with white bell on the left side and in the centre an upside down blue triangle with 27 white bells.

 

The Sunburst Flag

The Irish Republican Brotherhood adopted the Sunburst Flag in 1858. It was originally a green field with golden rising sun but recently during marches a flag with a blue field and half an orange rising sun has been used.

The Original Sunburst Flag

The New Sunburst Flag

The Starry Plough Flag

Irish Nationalists and trade unionists have flown the Starry Plough Flag since the 1930s. It features a sky blue field with seven five-pointed white stars.

The Proposed Flag of the Ulster Nation

The Proposed Flag of the Ulster Nation is the saint Patrick’s cross on a dark blue field with a yellow six-pointed star and red hand of Ulster in the centre.

The Historical Flag of the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland

The Flag of the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland was flown between 1801 and 1922. It is a Union Flag defaced with a dark blue shield and golden harp.

The Historical Flag of the Governor of Northern Ireland

The Flag of the Governor of Northern Ireland was flown between 1922 and 1973. It is a Union Flag defaced with laurel bordered white circle and shield made up of the Ulster banner.

The Historical Ensign of the Government of Northern Ireland

The Flag of the Government of Northern Ireland was flown between 1929 and 1973. It is a British Blue Ensign with white circle with red letters spelling GNI in the right side.

Useful Links

Download Our Brochure

Download our electronic brochure to check out the full range of products we can supply you with.

Download Now

Contact Us

See a flag you like? We can manufacture any flag design in any size, speak to one of our experts to find out more.

Contact Us

Exclusive offers direct to your inbox

Subscribe today to receive offers available only to our subscribers.

You can unsubscribe at any time

Registered and Accredited

Loading...